28/01/20 

Adorned- The Fashionable Show 

Whilst on a trip to Amsterdam, I visited Foam Gallery and had the opportunity to see Adorned- The Fashionable Show. This was an interesting and unique exhibition to be able visually witness as it brought the audiences focus to alternative fashion and the role it can play in shaping and projecting personal identity. One photographer’s work who stood out to me was Tyler Mitchel, a photographer and film maker from Brooklyn, NY who utilizes his photography to visually document and express ‘black utopia’ (Mitchel , Tyler, n.d.) Through the use natural artificial light, bright and psychedelic colour and the capturing of his subjects in outdoor/scenic locations or against simplistic backdrops. These features help to visually express this idea that black youth can also be free, passionate, expressive… I was intrigued by this photograph, because the portrait signifies more than just a visually pleasing fashion photograph, the ideals behind the imagery reflect black culture and the way they can express their culture. My fascination with Tyler’s work is how he manipulates colour and the simplicity of his subjects into a very powerful and pleasing fashion images with a strong context behind them.

In preparation for our final exhibition, I used the opportunity I had to explore the museum for inspiration on the scale of print I would like to display. Tyler’s work was 16×20, which I thought was a reasonable size as is it eye catching and allows the viewer to focus solely on one image opposed to a series of different images.

The portrait by The Sartists taken from the series Our Tribe explores traditional South African cultural practices compared to contemporary values of the modern western world. I was interested in this portrait because the use of direct eye contact between the subject and the viewer grasps the audience’s attention and the simplistic portrait has the ability to tell a cultural story. By visually seeing a print on such a large scale of 16×20, has given me a perspective of what my own work could look like if I printed this size at our own exhibition.

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